Cooking with wine?

Can I Eat It iPhone App lets you know what is in the Yalumba Y Series Riesling, Australia barcode

Most shoppers like to add a little extra flavour by splashing a little red or white wine into their cooking.  Often this addition is a splash or glass of wine from an opened bottle or one that’s going to be drunk with that meal.  Be careful though…that enthusiastic splash or that ‘throw anything in kitchen madness’ may just detract from the taste experience rather than enhance it.

If you’re cooking with wine forget the wonderful times associated with drinking it – just treat it as a bottle of ingredients.  End of. Will it add anything to the finished meal?  If not. Leave it out!  There is no point in adding an expensive ingredient if it does not enhance the taste of the meal – it’s simply not good home economics!

Not sure which type or colour of wine you should cook with? The below may help a little.

The main ingredients and flavours in red wine:
Alcohol (most disappears with cooking)
Sugar (tiny amounts in dry wine)
Anthocyanins (colour pigments mostly from the grape’s skins,  thicker the skins or longer the skin’s maceration, deeper the colour)
Tannins (from the skins, pips, oak planks, oak barrels)
Yeast (indigenous from the grape skins and added cultured yeasts)
Acid (mainly malic, tartaric and citric)
Fruit flavours (mainly from the  juice, grape skins and the added yeasts).

The upside:

Red wine adds colour and fruit flavours.

The downside:

As the alcohol burns off and the tongue curling dry tannins start to dominate the flavour, especially, in heavily oaked or deep coloured wines.  You’ll hardly notice them in a flavoursome beef bourguignon, but at their heaviest they’ll spoil a subtle sauce.

Best buys:

Un-oaked or lightly oaked reds – Beaujolais is an excellent example.

The main ingredients and flavours in white wine:
Alcohol (most disappears with cooking)
Sugar (tiny amounts in dry wine)
Tannins (from wines fermented or matured in oak)
Yeast (indigenous from the grape skins and added cultured yeasts)
Acidity (malic, tartaric and citric)
Fruit flavours (mainly from the juice, grape skins and the added yeasts).

The upside:

Pronounced floral, stone and green fruit flavours from un-oaked white wines. The best examples are wines from: muscat, riesling, torrontes and the gewurztraminer grapes

The downside:

Un-oaked white wines won’t add colour, oaked whites will add a little.

Best buys:

Ovoid heavily oaked whites and use ones that have made from or display Muscat, Riesling, Torrontes and Gewurztraminer on the label.

Yalumba Y Series Riesling, Australia 

Try the app now:

Can I Eat It iPhone App lets you know what is in the Yalumba Y Series Riesling, Australia   barcodeCan I Eat It iPhone App lets you know what is in the Yalumba Y Series Riesling, Australia barcode

Not forgetting:

Sainsbury’s Taste The Difference Beaujolais Villages, Beaujolais, France
Closed with a screwcap.  This easy-drinking beaujolais delivers cherry and strawberry like flavours that are threaded with spiky mouth-cleansing acidity.
Competing Brands: George Duboeuf & Piat D’Or

 

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