Food’s fifth taste and it’s not umami

Can I Eat It iPhone App lets you know what is in the Bruichladdich Islay Single Malt Whisky, Islay, Scotland

There is a growing momentum in the restaurant world to promote umami, the natural flavour enhancer in some types of food, to the elevated position of the fifth taste! The first four are: sweet, salty, sour and bitter.  Sorry guys.  You are a thousand or so years too late.  Food and drink’s fifth taste is – terroir!

Terroir is the name for the unique flavours imparted to a product, generally food and wine, from a particular plot of land. Soil, climate, aspect and sunlight all play their part in creating terroir’s special taste.

The French have always insisted for example, that the terroir taste of Burgundy wine, Dijon Mustard or Bresse Chicken cannot be produced anywhere but in those places. Likewise Italy’s Chianti wine, Parma Ham and Scotland’s single Malt whiskies.

For anyone that wants to experience terroir the fifth taste at its most dynamic – should take trip to Burgundy.  Winemakers there delight in demonstrating the impact that the vineyard and soil variations have on the finished wine.  Any drinker will be left in no doubt that terroir is the fifth taste.

Bruichladdich Islay Single Malt Whisky, Islay, Scotland 

Try the app now:

Can I Eat It iPhone App lets you know what is in the Bruichladdich Islay Single Malt Whisky, Islay, Scotland Can I Eat It iPhone App lets you know what is in the Bruichladdich Islay Single Malt Whisky, Islay, Scotland

Not Forgetting:

Grey Poupon Prepared Dijon Mustard
Want a top notch Dijon mustard? Grey Poupon is as good as you’ll find on the supermarket shelves. If the size, style and price fits – put it in the trolley.

ALDI Specially Selected Parma Prosciutto di Parma Italian Parma Ham, Italy
Selected legs of Italian pork are hand-rubbed with sea salt and slowly cured for 14 months. As good as you’ll find on the supermarket shelves. Put a pack in the trolley.

Tesco Finest Chablis, Grand Cuvee, White Burgundy, France
Tesco Want a cheaper alternative to the big name producers? Then this Chablis with its mouth-watering acidity and flinty lick on the swallow is worth a punt.
Competing Brands: William Fevre, Blason de Bourgogne & Louis Jadot

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